Thesis autonomous underwater vehicle auv

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Despite the many AUV technology advances that have been made, power remains a limiting factor. As autonomy algorithms increase in robustness, complexity, and reliability, so too does the ability of AUVs to perform an even-increasing array of complex missions.

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Maritime tasks that once required a fleet of ships, months to complete, and numerous mariners are now being performed by AUVs with little to no logistical support elements.

The current method for deploying this type of AUV requires charging it above water, shipping it to a mission site, and then deploying it overboard with the use of cranes. It is electrically isolated from the power source through the use of an input transformer and is compact enough to be integrated into an AUV for future testing.

It is electrically isolated from the power source through the use of an input transformer and is compact enough to be integrated into an AUV for future testing.

The AUV is then recovered once the mission is complete or - more likely - when its power source is depleted.

Power is supplied inductively to a receiver coil in the AUV. The system is capable of providing up to W of instantaneous power to a single pack. Maritime tasks that once required a fleet of ships, months to complete, and numerous mariners are now being performed by AUVs with little to no logistical support elements.

The primary applications are i submarine volcanism and hydrothermal vent studies, ii mapping and monitoring of low-temperature fluid escape features and chemosynthetic ecosystems, iii benthic habitat mapping in shallow- and deep-water environments, and iv mapping of seafloor morphological features e.

Power is supplied inductively to a receiver coil in the AUV. This thesis addresses a fraction of the underwater AUV power transfer and rapid charging challenge through the development of the power electronics required to reliably charge a single battery pack.

The deployment and recovery phases are time-intensive, limited by weather conditions and sea state, and often hazardous to both crew and AUV.

Most AUVs use onboard stored electric energy and electric drive to perform their various missions. This thesis addresses a fraction of the underwater AUV power transfer and rapid charging challenge through the development of the power electronics required to reliably charge a single battery pack.

An overview of published AUV data in marine geoscience is presented. This power is then transferred to a down converter with a current-sensing feedback controller to provide a regulated current under the varying load voltage of the battery pack. This power is then transferred to a down converter with a current-sensing feedback controller to provide a regulated current under the varying load voltage of the battery pack.

While deployment and recovery will remain critical, high-risk evolutions, there exists a need to find a safer and faster recharging method that does not require recovery of the vehicle. Despite the many AUV technology advances that have been made, power remains a limiting factor.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Date Issued: Previous article in issue. This contribution focuses on the major advances in marine geoscience that have resulted from AUV data. The current method for deploying this type of AUV requires charging it above water, shipping it to a mission site, and then deploying it overboard with the use of cranes.

A series of new datasets is presented that highlight the growing versatility of AUVs for marine geoscience studies, including i multi-frequency acoustic imaging of trawling impacts on deep-water coral mounds, iii collection of high-resolution seafloor photomosaics at abyssal depths, and iii velocity measurements of active submarine density flows.

They have revolutionised our ability to image the seafloor, providing higher resolution seafloor mapping data than can be achieved from surface vessels, particularly in deep water.

While deployment and recovery will remain critical, high-risk evolutions, there exists a need to find a safer and faster recharging method that does not require recovery of the vehicle. Abstract Autonomous Underwater Vehicles AUVs have a wide range of applications in marine geoscience, and are increasingly being used in the scientific, military, commercial, and policy sectors.

The deployment and recovery phases are time-intensive, limited by weather conditions and sea state, and often hazardous to both crew and AUV.

As autonomy algorithms increase in robustness, complexity, and reliability, so too does the ability of AUVs to perform an even-increasing array of complex missions. Future developments in AUV technology of potential relevance to marine geoscience include new vehicles with enhanced hovering, long endurance, extreme depth, or rapid response capabilities, while development of new sensors will further expand the range of geochemical parameters that can be measured.

The AUV is then recovered once the mission is complete or - more likely - when its power source is depleted.

The system is capable of providing up to W of instantaneous power to a single pack. Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Modern robotics have enabled the rapid proliferation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles AUVs throughout the marine environment. Most AUVs use onboard stored electric energy and electric drive to perform their various missions.MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE CONTROL FOR THE REMUS AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLE by Christopher D.

Chuhran September Thesis Advisor: Anthony Healey. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE CONTROL FOR THE REMUS AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLE by Lynn Renee Fodrea.

This thesis addresses a fraction of the underwater AUV power transfer and rapid charging challenge through the development of the power electronics required to reliably charge a single battery pack.

Power is supplied inductively to a receiver coil in the AUV. Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs): Their past, present and future contributions to the advancement of marine geoscience.

e.g. Google searches undertaken in July for AUV marine geoscience and Autonomous. Design of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) charging system for underway, underwater recharging (AUV) charging system for underway, underwater recharging.

Download. there exists a need to find a safer and faster recharging method that does not require recovery of the vehicle.

This thesis addresses a fraction of the underwater. In multi-vehicle mine hunting operations, it will be necessary at times for one vehicle to loiter at some point while gathering communications of data from other vehicles.

The loitering behaviors of the ARIES Autonomous Underwater.

Download
Thesis autonomous underwater vehicle auv
Rated 4/5 based on 97 review