An analysis of the book huckleberry finn which can be interpreted in many different ways

Twain uses the two families to engage in some rollicking humor and to mock a overly romanticizes ideas about family honor. Huck does not laugh at humorous situations and statements simply because his literal approach does not find them to be funny; he fails to see the irony.

Continued on next page Huck does not intend his comment to be disrespectful or sarcastic; it is simply a statement of fact and is indicative of the literal, practical approach to life that he exhibits throughout the novel.

Although Huck quickly realizes the men are frauds, he and Jim remain at their mercy, as Huck is only a child and Jim is a runaway slave.

The sisters are, as Huck puts it, trying to "sivilize" him, and his frustration at living in a clean house and minding his manners starts to grow. Miss Watson tells Huck he will go to "the bad place" if he does not behave, and Huck thinks that will be okay as long as Miss Watson is not there.

Pap represents both the general debasement of white society and the failure of family structures in the novel. He does not project social, religious, cultural, or conceptual nuances into situations because he has never learned them.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Questions and Answers

Jim is superstitious and occasionally sentimental, but he is also intelligent, practical, and ultimately more of an adult than anyone else in the novel. Analysis The opening sentence of the novel notifies readers that Huck Finn is the narrator and will tell his story in his own words, in his own language and dialect complete with grammatical errors and misspellingsand from his own point of view.

During the evening, Huck accidentally kills a spider that was on his shoulder and worries that bad luck will follow. Huck simply reports what he sees, and the deadpan narration allows Twain to depict a realistic view of common ignorance, slavery, and the inhumanity that follows.

In Huckleberry Finn, Tom serves as a foil to Huck: As with several of the frontier literary characters that came before him, Huck possesses the ability to adapt to almost any situation through deceit.

These traits are part of the reason that Huck Finn was viewed as a book not acceptable for children, yet they are also traits that allow Huck to survive his surroundings and, in the conclusion, make the right decision. Read an in-depth analysis of Tom Sawyer. He observes the racist and anti-government rants of his ignorant father but does not condemn him because it is the "accepted" view in his world.

By using the first person narrative point of view, Twain carries on the southwestern humor tradition of vernacular language; that is, Huck sounds as a young, uneducated boy from Missouri should sound.

Essentially good people, the Phelpses nevertheless hold Jim in custody and try to return him to his rightful owner.

Read an in-depth analysis of Jim. The duke and the dauphin carry out a number of increasingly disturbing swindles as they travel down the river on the raft. The allusion reminds the reader of a novel about boys and their adventures, the purpose of which, according to Twain, was to rekindle in adults memories "of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in.

When Huck is unable to conform to the rules, he accepts that it is his own deficiency, not the rule, that is bad. He is playful but practical, inventive but logical, compassionate but realistic, and these traits allow him to survive the abuse of Pap, the violence of a feud, and the wiles of river con men.

Abstractly, he does not recognize the contradiction of "loving thy neighbor" and enforcing slavery at the same time. Because Huck believes that the laws of society are just, he condemns himself as a traitor and a villain for acting against them and aiding Jim.

When the town clock strikes twelve midnight, Huck hears a noise outside his window and climbs out to find Tom Sawyer waiting for him.

The Widow Douglas is somewhat gentler in her beliefs and has more patience with the mischievous Huck. As a coming of age character in the late nineteenth century, Huck views his surroundings with a practical and logical lens. The gaunt and severe Miss Watson is the most prominent representative of the hypocritical religious and ethical values Twain criticizes in the novel.

More important, Huck believes that he will lose his chance at Providence by helping a slave. The kindhearted Grangerfords, who offer Huck a place to stay in their tacky country home, are locked in a long-standing feud with another local family, the Shepherdsons.

This first sentence also alludes to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Nevertheless, Huck is still a boy, and is influenced by others, particularly by his imaginative friend, Tom.

This first chapter introduces several major literary elements. It is important to note, however, that Huck himself never laughs at the incongruities he describes. Huck is the thirteen-year-old son of the local drunk of St. Because Huck is young and uncivilized, he describes events and people in a direct manner without any extensive commentary.

His observations are not filled with judgments; instead, Huck observes his environment and gives realistic descriptions of the Mississippi River and the culture that dominates the towns that dot its shoreline from Missouri south.

It is his literal, pragmatic approach to his surroundings and his inner struggle with his conscience that make him one of the most important and recognizable figures in American literature. To persevere in these situations, Huck lies, cheats, steals, and defrauds his way down the river.

For example, Huck simply accepts, at face value, the abstract social and religious tenets pressed upon him by Miss Watson until his experiences cause him to make decisions in which his learned values and his natural feelings come in conflict.Organizational Patterns ♦ Huckleberry Finn is organized into forty three chapters, ranging from eight to twelve pages.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

This edition contains a total of pages. Different Parts of the Same Book. jazaniac In human society, one of the most prominent influences throughout its history has Huckleberry Finn, or the Christian merchants in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice’s interpreted in so many different ways shows that it is not nearly decisive enough towards a specific message, especially.

Your book-smartest friend just got a makeover. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; How to Write Literary Analysis; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by: Mark Twain Summary. Plot Overview; Summary & Analysis; Notice and Explanatory; How to Write Literary Analysis. Huckleberry “Huck” Finn - The protagonist and narrator of the novel.

Huck is the thirteen-year-old son of the local drunk of St. Petersburg, Missouri, a town on the Mississippi River. Huck is the thirteen-year-old son of the local drunk of St.

Petersburg, Missouri, a town on the Mississippi River. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain is a great example of a satire that Twain uses to mock different aspects of the society.

Satire In Huckleberry Finn English Literature Essay. Print Reference this. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic.

Huckleberry's Education The book Huckleberry Finn can be interpreted in many different ways. Even though in the beginning o Save Essay. Historic Analysis of Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" The movie that the class watched dealt with the classic novel Huckleberry Finn.

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An analysis of the book huckleberry finn which can be interpreted in many different ways
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